Morton, Rachael

Assessing the Potential for Patient-led Surveillance After Treatment of Localized Melanoma (MEL-SELF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

Abstract Importance: Patient-led surveillance is a promising new model of follow-up care following excision of localized melanoma. Objective: To determine whether patient-led surveillance in patients with prior localized primary cutaneous melanoma is as safe, feasible, and acceptable as clinician-led surveillance. Design, setting, and participants: This was a pilot for a randomized clinical trial at 2 specialist-led clinics in metropolitan Sydney, Australia, and a primary care skin cancer clinic managed by general practitioners in metropolitan Newcastle, Australia. The participants were 100 patients who had been treated for localized melanoma, owned a smartphone, had a partner to assist with skin self-examination (SSE), and had [...]

November 24th, 2021|Comments Off on Assessing the Potential for Patient-led Surveillance After Treatment of Localized Melanoma (MEL-SELF): A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial.

Association Between Melanoma Detected During Routine Skin Checks and Mortality.

Abstract Importance: Early melanoma diagnosis is associated with better health outcomes, but there is insufficient evidence that screening, such as having routine skin checks, reduces mortality. Objective: To assess melanoma-specific and all-cause mortality associated with melanomas detected through routine skin checks, incidentally or patient detected. A secondary aim was to examine patient, sociodemographic, and clinicopathologic factors associated with different modes of melanoma detection. Design, setting, and participants: This prospective, population-based, cohort study included patients in New South Wales, Australia, who were diagnosed with melanoma over 1 year from October 23, 2006, to October 22, 2007, in the Melanoma Patterns of Care Study [...]

November 3rd, 2021|Comments Off on Association Between Melanoma Detected During Routine Skin Checks and Mortality.

Adjuvant immunotherapy recommendations for stage III melanoma: physician and nurse interviews.

Abstract Background: Adjuvant immunotherapy is revolutionising care for patients with resected stage III and IV melanoma. However, immunotherapy may be associated with toxicity, making treatment decisions complicated. This study aimed to identify factors physicians and nurses considered regarding adjuvant immunotherapy for melanoma. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with physicians (medical oncologists, surgeons and dermatologists) and nurses managing patients with resected stage III melanoma at three Australian tertiary melanoma centres between July 2019 and March 2020. Factors considered regarding adjuvant immunotherapy were explored. Recruitment continued until data saturation and thematic analysis was undertaken. Results: Twenty-five physicians and nurses, aged 28-68 years, 60% females, [...]

September 10th, 2021|Comments Off on Adjuvant immunotherapy recommendations for stage III melanoma: physician and nurse interviews.

Impact of personal genomic risk information on melanoma prevention behaviors and psychological outcomes: a randomized controlled trial

Abstract Purpose: We evaluated the impact of personal melanoma genomic risk information on sun-related behaviors and psychological outcomes. Methods: In this parallel group, open, randomized controlled trial, 1,025 Australians of European ancestry without melanoma and aged 18-69 years were recruited via the Medicare database (3% consent). Participants were randomized to the intervention (n = 513; saliva sample for genetic testing, personalized melanoma risk booklet based on a 40-variant polygenic risk score, telephone-based genetic counseling, educational booklet) or control (n = 512; educational booklet). Wrist-worn ultraviolet (UV) radiation dosimeters (10-day wear) and questionnaires were administered at baseline, 1 month postintervention, and 12 [...]

August 12th, 2021|Comments Off on Impact of personal genomic risk information on melanoma prevention behaviors and psychological outcomes: a randomized controlled trial

Identifying the ‘Active Ingredients’ of an Effective Psychological Intervention to Reduce Fear of Cancer Recurrence: A Process Evaluation.

Abstract Purpose: Psychological interventions targeting fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) are effective in reducing fear and distress. Process evaluations are an important, yet scarce adjunct to published intervention trials, despite their utility in guiding the interpretation of study outcomes and optimizing intervention design for broader implementation. Accordingly, this paper reports the findings of a process evaluation conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial of a psychological intervention for melanoma patients. Methods: Men and women with a history of Stage 0-II melanoma at high-risk of developing new primary disease were recruited via High Risk Melanoma Clinics across Sydney, Australia and randomly allocated to receive the [...]

June 7th, 2021|Comments Off on Identifying the ‘Active Ingredients’ of an Effective Psychological Intervention to Reduce Fear of Cancer Recurrence: A Process Evaluation.
Go to Top